Garlic Mashed Potatoes

The more garlic you use, the safer from vampires you will be. I used 5 big cloves and I’m feeling pretty safe right now. Vampires and germs will both stay away, I’m sure.

I’m a big fan of mashed potatoes – actually, potatoes, in almost any form you can name. Double baked, cheese on top, sour cream or cream cheese added, baked crispy, fried, stick form, tot form, patty form. I must, admit, though, that sometimes mashed just seems to be going through the motions.

A little less great than they could be, perhaps? Not really putting in their best effort, never mind that I’m the one cooking and preparing them. As the Brothers Osborne sing, It Ain’t My Fault. 🙂

Ingredients:

  • Peeled potatoes – as many as you normally use for a meal
  • garlic cloves, chopped roughly – I used 4 big ones for 5 medium sized potatoes
  • chicken broth to cover the potatoes in the pot – instead of water
  • butter (or margarine) – 2 TB to ¼ cup
  • heavy whipping cream (or milk or half and half or buttermilk or almond milk-whatever you use), about 1/8 to ¼ cup
  • a whisk, potato masher or potato ricer
Peeled potatoes.

Peel, wash and cut your potatoes into pieces that are about even sizes. If you prefer big chunks, use big chunks. If you prefer cubes, use cubes. Whatever makes you happy.

Chopped into similar sized pieces.

Peel and chop the garlic – it’s going to be cooked and mashed so don’t sweat the size of the pieces.

Rough cut garlic.

Add the potatoes and garlic to a cooking pot large enough for them and cover with the chicken broth.

Homemade chicken broth.

Put on the stove and bring to a boil. Turn down the heat a bit and let simmer, unless you’re using my stove, in which case, on the burner I was using, if you get an actual boil, you should get a lottery ticket. It’ll simmer all on its own, don’t worry about turning down that heat.

Cooking it all together.

When the potatoes are fork tender (poke with a fork, if they can be easily pierced by the fork, they are done), take off the heat and drain the broth out. Use a colander so the potatoes can sit an dry out for a few minutes while you heat up the butter and milk/cream. While the potatoes are in detention, use the pot on the burner you were just using and melt 2 or 3 tablespoons of butter with about ¼ cup of heavy cream or whatever you’re using. If you’re only using 1 potato, cut down the amount of cream and butter – you aren’t making potato soup. 🙂

Drained & drying off a bit.

Once the cream and butter are heated up, add the potatoes back into the pan, take off the heat and mash ’em up. Make them smooth or leave them lumpy, whichever makes you warm and happy inside.

If you look closely, there is cream and butter that was heated and is getting mixed in. Yummy!

Then serve them up. We had them with Salisbury steak and gravy with green beans on the side. Made my eyes cross they were so good.

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